Montana Wilderness Association

Montana Wilderness Association's mission is to protect Montana's wilderness heritage, quiet beauty and outdoor traditions, now and for future generations. Established in 1958 by Montanans who were instrumental in the passage of the Wilderness Act of 1964, MWA subsequently led the fight to win designation of virtually every Wilderness area in the state as well as Wild and Scenic designations for the Flathead and Missouri Rivers. As the nation's oldest grassroots Wilderness organization, MWA pursues its mission by educating and organizing people to protect Montana wildlands and empowers those people to influence and shape policy on Montana wilderness issues.

Montana Wilderness Association was a Brainerd Foundation grantee from 2000 to 2011.

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Montana Wilderness Association logo

Montana Wilderness Association Photo gallery

Photo courtesy of Pete Bengeyfield.

Photo courtesy of Jeff Van Tine.

Photo courtesy of Tom Kilmer.

Photo courtesy of Montana Wilderness Association.

Photo courtesy of Montana Wilderness Association.

Montana Wilderness Association Grant history

2011

$50,000 - To protect wildlands throughout Montana. Place-based conservation

2010

$45,000 - To permanently protect significant wildlands throughout Montana. Place-based conservation

2009

$45,000 - To build public support for the protection of Montana's public wildlands. Place-based conservation

2008

$40,000 - To build public support for the protection of Montana’s public wildlands. Place-based conservation

2006

$20,000 - To build public support for the protection of Montana's public wildlands. Place-based conservation

2003

$40,000 - To bolster coalition efforts to protect the Rocky Mountain Front from the imminent dual threat of mineral exploration and development and expanded ORV use. Place-based conservation

2002

$300,000 - To increase membership, donor base and organizational effectiveness. Conservation capacity

2001

$25,000 - To develop a plan for increasing organizational effectiveness. Conservation capacity

2001

$1,900 - To build public support for the protection of the Rocky Mountain Front from energy development and defend new attacks to administrative protections now in place for the region. Opportunity fund

2000

$50,000 - To protect Montana's public wildlands. Place-based conservation

2000

$2,000 - To build public support for roadless areas protection in Montana. Opportunity fund

Montana Wilderness Association Successes

Rocky Mountain Front Heritage Act creates first new Wilderness in Montana in 31 years

In December 2014, the Rocky Mountain Front Heritage Act passed Congress, adding 67,000 acres of new Wilderness to the Bob Marshall Wilderness Complex, creating a 208,000-acre Conservation Management Area where current uses can continue, and directing federal agencies to prioritize noxious weed management on the Front. The Brainerd Foundation supported the work of Montana Wilderness Association, National Parks Conservation Association, and the Wilderness Society in this effort.

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