Yukon Conservation Society

The Yukon Conservation Society was formed in 1968 by a group of concerned Yukoners to promote the conservation ethic in the Yukon and across the north. The YCS mandate is to encourage the conservation of Yukon wilderness, wildlife and natural resources.

Yukon Conservation Society was a Brainerd Foundation grantee from 2000 to 2011.

Visit the website »

Yukon Conservation Society logo

Yukon Conservation Society Photo gallery

Red Ridge, Yukon Territory. Photo courtesy of Yukon Conservatio Society.

Tagish Lake, Yukon Territory. Photo courtesy of Yukon Conservation Society.

Tagish Lake, Yukon Territory. Photo courtesy of Yukon Conservation Society.

Teslin Lake, Yukon Territory. Photo courtesy of Yukon Conservation Society.

Tombstone Park, Yukon Territory. Photo courtesy of Yukon Conservation Society.

Yukon Conservation Society Grant history

2011

$3,000 - For outreach for protection of the Peel Watershed. Opportunity fund

2010

$3,000 - To conduct two ENGO/First Nation strategic planning sessions to protect the Peel Watershed from development. Opportunity fund

2010

$50,000 - To protect and conserve the wilderness and the ecological integrity of the Yukon's Peel River Watershed. Place-based conservation

2009

$3,000 - To protect the Peel Watershed from inappropriate mineral extraction and oil and gas development. Opportunity fund

2007

$3,000 - To fund a legal review of the Yukon Territory's draft Forest Act. Opportunity fund

2002

$20,000 - To negotiate improved placer mining regulations and closure of the Brewery Creek heap leach mine while promoting a moratorium on new oil and gas exploration in the Territory. Place-based conservation

2001

$20,000 - To establish a full-time mining coordinator position to monitor hardrock mining activities in the Territory. Place-based conservation

2001

$1,200 - To build leadership capacity within the organization. Opportunity fund

2000

$20,000 - To examine the real costs of mining in the Yukon, particularly its impacts on women and the environment. Place-based conservation

2000

$2,000 - To generate community support, a business plan, and public education on timber issues in the Yukon. Opportunity fund

Yukon Conservation Society Successes

First Nations rights upheld, Peel River Watershed protected

In December 2014, the Yukon Supreme Court ruled in favor of First Nations and the conservation community, overturning a Yukon government decision that would have opened up the 17 million acre Peel River Watershed to mining and resource development. The court decision reiterates the government's responsibility to consult with First Nations on land management plans affecting aboriginal lands and rights. The Brainerd Foundation supported the work of CPAWS and the Yukon Conservation Society in their strong endorsement of First Nations rights and conservation in the Peel Watershed.

Go »