Washington Environmental Council

Washington Environmental Council, founded in 1967, functions as a coalition of conservation organizations and individual members dedicated to the protection and restoration of the state's natural resounces. It concentrates primarily on legislation affecting Washington's environment.

Washington Environmental Council has been a Brainerd Foundation grantee since 2000.

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Washington Environmental Council logo

Washington Environmental Council Photo gallery

Kids at Van Asselt Elementary in Seattle enjoy a the fruits of the Local Farms - Healthy Kids Act. Photo courtesy of Kerri Cechovic, Washington Environmental Council.

Photo courtesy of Ervin Jindrich.

Washington Environmental Council Grant history

2017

$100,000 - To protect, restore, and sustain Washington’s environment for all. Conservation policy

2016

$25,000 - For a new strategic plan, staff development, and communications support. Conservation capacity

2015

$200,000 - A two-year grant to protect, restore, and sustain Washington's environment. Conservation policy

2014

$55,000 - To protect, restore, and sustain Washington's environment. Conservation policy

2014

$3,000 - To cover costs of a leadership course. Opportunity fund

2013

$150,000 - To help state legislators become stronger and more effective environmental leaders. Conservation policy

2013

$65,000 - To protect, restore, and sustain Washington's environment. Conservation policy

2012

$3,000 - To hire a communications specialist to help with the announcement of a new program area. Opportunity fund

2012

$75,000 - For voter education, outreach, and communications on behalf of the Washington environmental community. Conservation capacity

2011

$10,000 - To refresh and update the organization's Web site. Conservation capacity

2011

$75,000 - To expand the environmental base and improve message coordination. Conservation capacity

2011

$150,000 - To protect, restore, and sustain Washington's environment. Conservation policy

2010

$100,000 - To improve the conservation community's ability to effectively communicate with policy-makers and the public. Conservation policy

2009

$150,000 - To protect Washington's land, air and water through outreach and advocacy. Conservation policy

2009

$100,000 - To implement a communications plan on behalf of the Environmental Priorities Coalition.

2008

$30,000 - To protect Washington's land, air and water by engaging citizens in civic participation. Conservation policy

2008

$40,000 - To improve the conservation community's ability to effectively communicate with policymakers and the public.

2007

$50,000 - To support the merger of WEC with Washington Conservation Voters Education Fund (WCVEF). Conservation capacity

2007

$100,000 - For general support emphasizing an expanded and strategic role for Washington's environmental future. Conservation policy

2005

$100,000 - For general support emphasizing implementation of a new strategic plan and embracing an expanded and strategic role for Washington's environmental future. Conservation capacity

2002

$300,000 - To increase WEC's membership, communications capacity and organizational effectiveness. Conservation capacity

2001

$25,000 - To develop a plan for increasing WEC's organizational effectiveness. Conservation capacity

2000

$25,000 - To develop a comprehensive strategic plan and implement a technology upgrade. Place-based conservation

Washington Environmental Council Successes

Coal Export Terminal Permit Denied

Coal Export Terminal Permit Denied

The Washington Department of Ecology denied permits for the Millennium Bulk project, which would have shipped by rail and then vessel a staggering 44 million tons of coal per year to markets in Asia. The Washington DOE cited unavoidable harms in nine environmental areas that were identified in the project’s formal review.

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Gateway abandons Cherry Point coal plans

Gateway abandons Cherry Point coal plans

Backers of the Gateway Pacific Terminal withdrew their applications to build a 48-million-ton-per-year coal export terminal at Cherry Point, Washington. This conclusive victory comes after the Army Corps of Engineers acknowledged that the coal terminal would violate the Lummi Nation's treaty-protected fishing rights. The Brainerd Foundation has supported the work of Climate Solutions and Washington Environmental Council on this issue.

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Plans for Washington Coast crude oil export terminal derailed

Plans for Washington Coast crude oil export terminal derailed

The Supreme Court of Washington State has unanimously ruled that plans to locate a rail-fed crude oil export terminal at Hoquiam in Grays Harbor fall under the state's Ocean Resources Management Act. The decision will lead to a full environmental review and will temporarily, if not permanently, halt the project. Brainerd grantees Climate Solutions and Washington Environmental Council have worked hard with the Stand Up to Oil coalition on this issue.

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Washington State rejects proposed coal export terminal

Washington State rejects proposed coal export terminal

The people of Washington have convinced one of the state's most powerful agencies, the Department of Natural Resources, to deny a key approval for the last, largest remaining coal terminal proposal in Longview. The DNR rejected a request to use state-owned land in the Columbia River to build new docks to export coal. Brainerd grantees Climate Solutions, Sightline, and Washington Environmental Council joined the Power Past Coal Coalition to fight for this ruling.

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Shell Anacortes drops plans for new crude oil-by-rail

Shell Anacortes drops plans for new crude oil-by-rail

In another sign that crude-by-rail is a losing proposition, Shell Puget Sound Refinery in Anacortes today announced that it is dropping its plans to construct a crude-by-rail facility. Originally proposed in 2014, community opposition and legal challenges forced Shell and Skagit County to undertake a full environmental and public health review under the State Environmental Policy Act. That delay, growing local and regional opposition, and uncertain economics contributed to Shell’s decision.

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U.S. Army Corps rejects coal export permit to protect tribal fishing rights

U.S. Army Corps rejects coal export permit to protect tribal fishing rights

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has denied permits for the biggest proposed coal export terminal in North America, recognizing that the project would impact the treaty-protected fishing rights of the Lummi Nation. This comes after a five-year struggle by the Lummi Nation, the Power Past Coal coalition, and other allies. Photo courtesy of Alex Garland and the Backbone Campaign.

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Washington community says no to 2 fossil fuel terminals

Washington community says no to 2 fossil fuel terminals

In Washington, the community of Longview and the Stand Up to Oil campaign defeated not one, but two, dangerous and dirty fossil fuel terminal proposals on the Columbia River on the same day. In a unanimous vote, Port of Longview commissioners rejected a proposal by Waterside Energy to build the first oil refinery on the west coast in 25 years. The commissioners also rejected Waterside’s plan for a propane export terminal. (Photo courtesy of Sightline.)

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