Alaska Center

Alaska Center is Alaska's leading state-based conservation advocacy organization. Founded in 1972, it was transformed into a new and more powerful organization through a merger with the Alaska Conservation Alliance and Alaska Youth for Environmental Action in 2012. It focuses on key conservation issues with statewide significance, collaborates with allies around the state, and uses citizen engagement strategies to build a stronger base of support for conservation priorities.

Alaska Center has been a Brainerd Foundation grantee since 2001.

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Alaska Center Photo gallery

Anchorage, Alaska. Photo courtesy of Alaska Center for the Environment.

Photo courtesy of Alaska Center for the Environment.

Bike valet at the Alaska Ocean Festival. Photo courtesy of Alaska Center for the Environment.

Alaska Center Grant history

2016

$100,000 - To protect Alaska’s air, land, and water by promoting effective citizen engagement. Conservation policy

2015

$100,000 - To protect Alaska's air, land, and water by promoting effective citizen engagement. Conservation policy

2015

$3,000 - To fund a leadership summit to engage Alaska's youth in conservation issues. Opportunity fund

2014

$75,000 - To protect Alaska's air, land, and water by promoting effective citizen engagement. Conservation policy

2014

$50,000 - To protect Alaska's air, land, and water by promoting effective citizen engagement. Conservation capacity

2013

$50,000 - To provide leadership and strategic capacity to the collaborative efforts of conservationists statewide. Conservation policy

2013

$75,000 - To provide leadership and strategic capacity to the collaborative efforts of conservationists statewide. Conservation policy

2012

$30,000 - To build a new statewide organization capable of achieving lasting conservation gains. Conservation policy

2011

$45,000 - To enhance Alaskan's quality of life by protecting wild places, fostering sustainable communities, and promoting recreational opportunities. Conservation policy

2010

$45,000 - To improve the quality of life for Alaskans through responsible development, while preserving the wildlands and wildlife that make Alaska unique. Conservation policy

2009

$45,000 - To enhance Alaskans' quality of life by protecting wild places, fostering sustainable communities and promoting recreational opportunities. Conservation policy

2009

$15,000 - To implement new communications plans to achieve the mission of the organization. Conservation capacity

2008

$55,000 - To enhance the quality of life of Alaskans through natural resource and community health protection. Conservation policy

2007

$45,000 - For general support to enhance the quality of life of Alaskans though natural resource and community health protection. Conservation policy

2006

$25,000 - To build and broaden a base for conservation in Alaska. Place-based conservation

2004

$2,000 - For general support. Opportunity fund

2004

$25,000 - For general support, with a focus on minimizing the environmental impacts of coalbed methane development in Alaska. Place-based conservation

2003

$70,000 - For general support. Place-based conservation

2001

$48,300 - To continue to build ACE's membership, refine its strategic plan, and meet its organizational goals. Conservation capacity

Alaska Center Successes

Chuitna Coal Mine Shelved

Chuitna Coal Mine Shelved

After nearly a decade of dedicated advocacy by thousands of Alaskans in support of healthy fisheries, cultural preservation, and community sustainability, the company behind what would have been the largest strip mine in Alaska has suspended its pursuit of permitting. Thousands of Alaskans have spoken out against this project that would have traded wild salmon for low-grade coal. The Brainerd Foundation supported the work of Cook Inletkeeper and the Alaska Center on this issue.

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Alaska's Susitna River to remain wild and free-flowing

Alaska's Susitna River to remain wild and free-flowing

Alaska's governor has announced that the state will abandon efforts to put a mega hydroelectric dam on the wild Susitna River. Years of tireless advocacy from the Susitna River Coalition, Trout Unlimited, the Alaska Center, and others, led the overwhelming public opposition campaign. The Susitna, the nation's fourth longest undammed river, is also home to Alaska's fourth largest king salmon run.

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