People and Carnivores

People and Carnivores builds capacity in communities to improve or maintain coexistence with large carnivores as well as rangeland health and biodiversity. We do this by working with landowners, recreationists and managers to implement tools for wildlife conflict prevention and plan and implement strategic grazing of livestock.

People and Carnivores has been a Brainerd Foundation grantee since 2015.

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People and Carnivores logo

People and Carnivores Photo gallery

Grizzly track in forest road, Gravelly Mountain Range. Photo courtesy of Steve Primm.

Tracks of adult grizzly and cub, Greenhorn Range, Montana, the northern and western-most confirmed grizzly family in Greater Yellowstone. Photo courtesy of Nathan Korb.

Livestock Guardian Dogs protecting cattle in Montana's Big Hole Valley. Photo courtesy of Steve Primm, People and Carnivores.

The anchor dog for a Livestock Guardian Dog pack, being released with cattle for bonding on the Big Hole's Ruby Ranch. Photo courtesy of Steve Primm.

People and Carnivores Grant history

2016

$35,000 - To build organizational sustainability, support current wolf and grizzly conflict avoidance efforts, and and expand them to more watersheds across the High Divide. Place-based conservation

2015

$35,000 - To support current wolf and grizzly conflict avoidance efforts and expand them to a watershed and regional level across the High Divide. Place-based conservation

2015

$5,000 - To help facilitate a merger with Keystone Conservation that combines programs and launches a new organization. Conservation policy

People and Carnivores Successes

High Divide stakeholders recognized for groundbreaking work

High Divide stakeholders recognized for groundbreaking work

A recent article in Western Confluence magazine shines the spotlight on several Brainerd grantees, including the Wildlife Conservation Society, the Ruby Valley Conservation District, Headwaters Economics, the Blackfoot Challenge, and People and Carnivores. The author offers an excellent analysis of the absolute necessity of factoring in working lands in wildlife conservation and demonstrates the solutions-based work of ranchers in the High Divide, one of the Brainerd Foundation's place-based focus areas.